ENG 203        Narrative Reading Strategies                    Class Schedule

1.   Introduction to Reading Theories: Girl,  Kincaid
2.   Faulkner, A Rose for Emily: metaphor\metonymy
3.   Discussion: Deconstruction and Structuralism
4.   Faulkner, Barn Burning     paper due
5.   Kafka, The Metamorphosis
6.   Theories: discussion: Existentialism      Modernism
7.   Ellison, Battle Royal:  Race and Culture
8.   Kate Chopin, The Storm  and  The Story of an Hour
9.   Tillie Olsen, I Stand Here Ironing  or Elaine Showalter, “Quilt as Metaphor"  Feminist poetics  Gender Studies and Gynography
10.  Marquez, A Very Old man with Enormous Wings
11. Discussion: Magic Realism, Culture, Politics     Paper Due
12. Hawthorne, Young Goodman Brown    Figurative Language   Symbol vs. Metaphor
13. Jorge Luis Borges and Magic Realism, The Gospel According to Mark
14. Luke 15:11-32, The Parable of the Prodigal Son   Deconstruction
15. Discussion: Theology in interpretation
16. Eudora Welty,  A Warn Path      Interpretation
17. Introduction to Film Theory
18. Stanley Kubrick, The Shining
19. Film Narration            Film Representation
20. Stephen King's The Shining: film vs. novel
21. Discussion: Post-Modernism    Globalization and Reification
22. O'Connor, Parker’s Back    Paper due
23. O’Connor, Revelation Ethnography, racism, racialism, and ideology
24. Discussion: Pascal, Jansenism and O'Connor, A Good Man Is Hard to Find
25. Leslie Marmon Silko, The Man to Send Rain Clouds or Sherman Alexie What it Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona              Ethnicity and Race
26. Joyce, Araby: Modernism    Reports from students (library project)
27. Ursula K. LeGuin, The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas  Science Fiction/utopia
28. Hemingway A Clean, Well-Lighted Place   ideology
29. Conclusions      Realism, Modernism, Post-Modernism

Teacher: James Tomek    Ph. 846-4077 office hrs.   MWF 11-1       TuTh  10:45-12:15
Text: Literature    Kennedy, Gioia  12ed. (9th and 10th  and 11th eds. may be ok)

ENG 203\204   PHILOSOPHY OF THE COURSE
In the introductory literature courses, students will have the opportunity to learn reading and writing skills through the study of literature and its related arts and sciences. Eng 203 will focus more on narrative strategies, while Eng 204 will deal with performance type texts. Students will acquire reading skills in 3 areas of literature:
1. Literature as writing, where students will learn to identify the terms of representation, structure, writing, discourse, figurative language, narrative, performance, and author;
2. Literature as interpretation, where students will study concepts of interpretation, intention, unconscious, determinacy\indeterminacy, value\evaluation, influence and rhetoric;
3. Literature as culture where students will explore notions of culture, diversity, canonicity, gender, race, ethnicity, politics, ideology, historicity, existentialism, theology, structuralism, deconstruction, modernism and post-modernism.  

All these areas will be covered throughout the year in the 2 introductory courses. Some areas will receive more attention. Reading is the most important skill to ameliorate in order to live a fuller life and function better in society. Reading skills are consubstantial with writing, speaking, listening, and doing research in any field.

 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES     Students will write 3 papers (200-250 words). They will maintain a file of literary, narrative, and reading terms. There will be 4 short exams and a final examination where students will demonstrate comprehension of the reading material and literary terms discussed in class. In class, after each assigned reading students will write a short response. Students will do research in the library and will start a short annotated bibliography in their major field, or “possible” major field. They will find 5 articles and cite all 5 as in a term paper. Below each entry, they will supply a short description/summary of the article. They will choose one article and describe it more fully, discussing what possible minor fields would complement the “major” discipline. They will also explain what specific reading skills in this class will be of help.
GRADING
Class work, daily readings, oral, written responses.....20% *
4 quizes ......................................................................20%
3 papers.......................................................................10%
Library paper...............................................................10%
Final exam...................................................................40%**
Attendance is essential for successful work in this course. In addition to the University policy (p.55-56 DSU Bulletin – missing 25% of classes results in an F grade [12 cuts in a MWF class and 8 cuts in a Tues. Thurs. class]), unexcused absences will lower the class work grade (1 absence/1 letter grade, 2-5 absences/2 letter grades, 6 or more/no credit). The grades will be calculated according to the 4.0 system:  A=4.0, B=3.0, C=2.0, D=1.0, F=0. (below 1.0 is failing)
 *The class work grade is somewhat subjective, but based on real criteria.  (1) I expect students to read all the material, (2) to come to class with the text [students without the text being discussed will be asked to leave], (3) to follow the discussions attentively (look interested), and (4) to respond to questions in class or pose questions about the texts. I will let students know how well they are doing in class at least three times throughout the semester. If students come to class prepared, they should have little trouble obtaining a good mark for this part of the grading. Please take this part of the overall grade very seriously.

** The final examination is a summary of all the points covered during the semester. Under no circumstances will a final grade be two letter grades higher than the final examination grade. A failure in this exam will  result in a failing mark for the course.